Coe Partial Agreements


In the case of the creation of a new partial and enlarged agreement, as well as existing partial and extended agreements, the criteria set out in Resolution (96)36 as amended by Resolution CM/Res(2010) 2 of 5 May 2010 should also be respected. The Council of Europe works mainly through conventions. The drafting of international conventions or treaties establishes common legal standards for the Member States. However, several agreements have also been opened for signature for third countries. The Convention on Cybercrime (e.g. signed by Canada, Japan, South Africa and the United States), the Lisbon Convention on the Recognition of Periods and Diplomas (signed for example by Australia, Belarus, Canada, the Holy See, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, New Zealand and the United States), the Anti-Doping Convention (signed for example, by Australia, Belarus, Canada, Kyrgyzstan, Kyrgyzstan, New Zealand and the United States) (a) and the Convention for the Conservation of European Wild Fauna and Flora and Natural Habitats (signed for example by Burkina Faso, Morocco, Tunisia, Senegal and the European Community). Non-member States also participate in several sub-conventions, such as the Venice Commission, the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO), the European Pharmacopoeia Commission and the North-South Centre. Council of Europe conventions must be distinguished from partial agreements which are not international treaties, but only a particular form of co-operation within the Organisation. Partial agreements allow Council of Europe member states not to participate in a given activity, supported by other member states. From a legal point of view, a sub-agreement remains an activity of the Organization in the same way as the other activities of the programme, except that a sub-agreement has its own budget and working methods, defined exclusively by the members of the partial agreement. In accordance with a resolution adopted by the Committee of Ministers at its 9th session, the 2 considering that two conditions must be met to create a partial agreement: the Council of Europe cannot adopt binding laws, but it has the power to enforce certain international agreements concluded by European states on different subjects.

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